There are hundreds of fonts you can choose from for your Trinity portfolio, and it can be a bit overwhelming to decide find the right ones to use for your portfolio. These 6 simple guidelines will help you make decisions about what to choose without too much trial-and-error testing.

1. Know the difference between a “serif” and a “san-serif” font.

The flourishes on the T and x are called “serifs.” “Sans” means “without.” It may seem trivial, but it makes a big difference for readability.serif-vs-sans-serif

2. There is no clear about which font is more “readable” but in general, sans-serif fonts will look better in the Content::type option of your portfolio.

Serif Sans-Serif
Serif fonts are typically used in books, newspapers, and other print. In a paragraph of text, the serifs on characters connect letters to each other, making it easier for your brain to process text, but it can be more difficult to read on a screen. Digital media, especially websites, tend to use sans-serif fonts because they crisper and easier to read different sizes. Sans-serif fonts might be less visually interesting, but they are easy to read at most sizes and screen resolutions.

3. There are hundreds of font choices available for your  portfolio. Get comfortable with the Google Font Directory, so you don’t have to spend as much time with trial-and-error font selection in your the WordPress Customizer.

04_google_font_directory

Spend some time playing with the options on the right side of the interface to get a sense of what you like and what you want to avoid.

4. Display and Handwriting fonts should really only be used for in the Site title::text customizer option.

Display Handwriting
Display fonts can add a lot of personality to your site, but if they are applied to long sections of text, they can pretty difficult to read.

Translation: Display fonts can add a lot of personality to your site, but if they are applied to long sections of text, they can pretty difficult to read.

Handwriting fonts can also add a lot of personality to your site, but at smaller sizes, it gets difficult to read because the characters get muddled together.

Translation: Handwriting fonts can also add a lot of personality to your site, but at smaller sizes, it gets difficult to read because the characters get muddled together.

5. Accept that not all the fonts you see in the Google Font Directory will be available in your the WordPress Customizer.

There are more than we could reliably load into a website, but there are definitely similar fonts to the one you’re looking for. We update the list with the newest fonts each summer, so if you’re still in love with one of those few we don’t include, you can update it in the fall.

6. You have two font decisions to make for your portfolio. That’s all.

These options are Site Title::text and Content::text.

First, try a Sans-serif or medium thickness Serif font for Content::text (that’s the second option on the Customize menu).

If you’re happy with how your site looks with one font on all the content, you’re done! (The theme Fukasawa, in particular, looks great with a single font.)

Next, investigate popular pairings with the content text you chose in the Google Font Directory.  At the bottom of the specimen page for your chosen body font (eg, here’s a link to the specimen page for “Lato”), you will see a tool to preview this font with popular pairings.

05_popular_pairings
Or experiment on your own, in your portfolio, trying different fonts in your Site Title::text options. Investigate different display fonts in the  Google Font Directory, then try the combinations in your portfolio.

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